Budapest: paprikash, fancy thermal baths, and architecture of epic proportions

November 11, 2018
by Christina

We arrived at the Budapest train station late in the evening, and we were en-route when Dan made an unfortunate discovery: fresh reviews of our hostel complaining of bed bugs. And replies from the hostel essentially confirming them. We had a near-miss in the bed bug department in South America, and having no interest in repeating the stress, we went to get something to eat and decide where else to stay.

It was the sort of thing that pre-trip Christina might have gotten stressed over. There we were, in a big brand new city after dark, not sure where we were going to sleep, but all it took to fix it was looking over the other offerings online, making a new reservation, and walking the kilometer to get there. That’s the beauty of modern travel and having the internet in your pocket.

Our first impression of Budapest was how much amazing architecture there is, almost anywhere you look, from the train station itself, to buildings around the neighborhood. This is something that remained a theme throughout our stay.

We ended up staying three nights at Grand Backpackers Hostel, which was quite nice. It was an old building with high ceilings, but a new hostel, and the staff was all volunteers from around the world, which was fun.

Once we got checked in we ducked out for a quick doener kebab, which surprised us by being chicken and not pork, but it was plentiful and inexpensive. And there is a lot of it to be found around the city. (Also, note the cool guy jean jacket… and that’s just the teaser photo!)

After a relaxing morning at the hostel we set off for a run around the city. We ran from the hostel down to the Danube and ran along the ‘Buda’ side of the river (Buda being the west part of Budapest, Pest being the east part) to get the nice views of Parliament.

Our route took us around Margaret Island, which is a small narrow island in the Danube, with a nice running path, and occupied by a variety of sporting facilities including a water park. It was very beautiful in the fall weather.

We ended our run at Parliament, and took some photographs, including the ceremonial uniformed guards marching precisely out front by the flag pole. I was worried the police standing by would chastise me for taking a handstand video, but mostly they watched until they got bored and said nothing.

After our run we had a meal of traditional Hungarian soups at Főzelékfaló Ételbár restaurant nearby, then headed back to the hostel to have a shower. We also went and did some grocery shopping to supply a few meals that week, and cooked dinner that night at Grand Backpackers.

Our second day we walked past the Budapest Eye on our way to visit St. Stephen’s Basilica, which is very ornate with lots of gilt and beautiful paintings. They host organ concerts there, which I would have loved to see, but the timing didn’t work out for us, so I had to sustain myself by simply ogling the instrument.

We also stopped by the Opera House only to discovered it covered in scaffolding for renovations, both outside and in. We were able to enter and view the foyer and the gift shop, but were told that even the tour wouldn’t get to see much with the renovations of the main stage and there were no shows going on for the same reason.

After that we went to get lunch at a restaurant recommended at the hostel called Frici Papa, where we sampled dishes such as fruit soup (yes, it’s like a dessert with cherries and cream, but treated like a soup), mushroom goulash, and paprikash, the last dish having been made famous by the film When Harry Met Sally, but I had to go watch the clip again, all I had remembered was Pecan Piiiiiiie.

After our meal we took a walk around the neighborhood (there’s that cool guy jean jacket action shot!) and stopped by Szimpla Kert, recommended to us by our fellow AirBnB’er Barbara, who we met in Belgrade. It’s one of the “ruin” bars which are eclectic spaces filled with mismatched furniture and graffiti. Szimpla is supposed to be the first ruin bar, and its quite expansive and very cool. We went early in the day to get a good look at it, well before the party crowd, but it’s supposed to be a nice spot of nightlife and it looks it.

The morning of our third day we went to go visit Budapest’s velodrome, but sadly found it locked and closed, though we were permitted to stare at it through some windows and look at the framed historical facts on the wall (including some dedicated and infantile graffiti). Currently the center of the track is being used for ice hockey.

On the way back to the hostel we stopped for langos at Langos Kuko, which is a Hungarian dish involving fried bread topped with various fixings including a lot of dairy products. I got the Greek one, and my bread had not just tsatsiki, and feta, but also some kind of shredded cheese as well as the tomatoes and cucumbers. After that we stopped by the Imperial Pub for a beer.

After we collected our things and moved across the river to the Buda side to stay at an AirBnB we had found to get a feel for a different part of town. Once settled, we took a bus to the base of the Citadella hill and hiked up it, enjoying the statues, the view of the city, and the glorious fall weather. All in all a beautiful park where we stopped to watch the sunset.

Then we went to check out some baths. Budapest has a lot of hot springs and old Turkish baths, and of course, water, hot water, and bathing are some of my favorite things, so that was high on my list of things to check out. I also found this article about the different baths very helpful.

First stop was Rudas, which is adjacent to Citadella. Once there though, I discovered that as a woman, there is only one weekday when I can use the full bath area, and that day was not my day. The men get solo access four week days, women get one (Tuesdays), and the weekends are coed. So… sexism. Not a good look. There were other areas that I could have bought access to, but I decided I didn’t care to give them any of my hard earned woman-money, and so we walked on to Gellert.

Gellert is coed all week long, and one of the biggest, fanciest baths in Budapest, and therefore comes with a commensurate price tag of 5600 HUF (~$18 USD), which is twice the price of some of the other baths in the area. I decided to do it, but to wait until the next day when I would have more time for it. They also had a really cool light display on the building that night.

The next morning I got up and headed to Gellert in the morning. I paid my fee and was give a watch-ish looking wrist band with which to operate a locker. Entering the locker room I found a place to stash my things, not bothering with the changing cabins, and headed off to have a shower, …and discovered it was a coed locker room.

On my way in and while I changed I had seen only women, but I passed quite a few men on the way to the showers which turned out to be segregated. I finally figured it out without giving anyone a shock at least.

Gellert was a beautiful as promised, but there were a few things that drew my side eye. One, the big main swimming pool (not thermal) that you see in all the photos requires you to wear a swimming cap. Which if you didn’t bring you have to buy for another 1000 HUF. Second, the main outdoor pool was not in use, and considering that I weighed the number of pools I was buying access to when I decided what bath to attend, I was not psyched about that.

However, once I found the bits I liked, my eye rolling ceased. I like hot water, intolerably hot for some, so the 40 C pool suited me well, as did the sauna near the operating outdoor pool and one of the two steam rooms. I alternated cooking myself in the sauna/steam rooms with dunking in the cold plunge pools and floating dreamily in the more moderately temperatured bathing pools, and finished up with a shower.

Final bit of advice for Gellert: Once you’ve wandered around and think you’ve seen everything, double check the map because you may have missed something. The place is a large labyrinth and it took me a while to get oriented.

Our last full day in Budapest we went to see more of the city’s iconic architecture: Fisherman’s Bastion and Buda Castle. They are both located on the Buda side of the Danube, and within a moderate walking distance of each other. They are also two of the biggest tourist attractions in Budapest.

The Fisherman’s bastion is on a hill and includes a church and a series of walkways overlooking the Danube and the Pest side of the river. It’s made of beautiful white stone and attracts large crowds of tourists. The church and some of the walkways require an entry fee, but there’s plenty to see and enjoy for free.

Walking further along the hill you come to Buda Castle, which contains several museums. It’s a pretty extensive building and grounds to walk around, and again, lots of people but also lots of cool stuff to see for free on the exterior, as well as views of Buda and Pest, and there’s a nice little gift shop where I got some stickers.

The next morning was our last in Budapest, so we packed up and had a light breakfast before checking out and taking two local buses to the north side of the city to catch our international bus to our next destination: Vienna!

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